Guest Post: Summertime Reflections That Will Make This Year Easier

Guest Post: Summertime Reflections That Will Make This Year Easier

Have you seen any of the teacher memes on Pinterest emphasizing the differences between teachers in August and Teachers in May? I find them to be hilarious but completely accurate. The end of May equals exhaustion.

Every. Single. Year.

I have come to realize that running out of energy just as the school year ends is OK. That the natural consequence of ten months of hard work is fatigue. However, I have also learned that there are things I can do during the summer that will greatly lighten my load during the following year. Taking a break from all things school related is essential. The time available to “just do nothing” varies from teacher to teacher and from year to year. Read books that have nothing to do with education. Sleep late. Watch a movie. Go for a walk or a run. There is no wrong way to rest, relax, and recharge.

Taking time to reflect on the previous school year is also important. What did you do well? What were your greatest challenges? Make a list of the things you would like to do differently, and then prioritize that list. If you don’t do so already, creating a pacing guide for each subject you teach is the most significant thing you can do to begin lightening next year’s load. Start by printing a blank calendar for each month of the school year. Note holidays, testing dates, and early dismissal days. Record when progress reports are scheduled, when grades close each quarter, and when final exams will be given. After making a list of required units, determine both the start date and the test date of each. This step is harder than it looks which is why I use a pencil with a good eraser! If school starts the middle of August, the first unit will probably be complete around Labor Day. Do you give that first test the Friday before the three day weekend? If not, will you need to review on the following Tuesday before testing on Wednesday? How many units need to be completed by the end of the first semester? How much time do you need to review for EoC’s in the spring? The first time I sat down and gave serious thought to the pacing of units, I was shocked to realize that there were only two teaching days available the week of Thanksgiving; there was NO way to complete a chapter’s worth of work that time frame. There is also a surprisingly small window of teaching time between Thanksgiving and semester exams. Continue this process until your calendar is complete. Remember to leave a few days open for things that will come up unexpectedly and throw you off track. The next step is to tackle your unit plans.

It seems that once the school year starts, I have very little time to think about what and how I want to teach. To me, this is much more easily done when school is not in session. I go through each unit, updating note packets, modifying quizzes and tests, and improving activities and labs. I also eliminate material that is no longer useful. Taking time during the summer to improve the content of my lessons greatly lowers my anxiety throughout the year. The old adage, “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure” applies to the way I use summertime reflections to improve my health and happiness throughout the school year. While it may be impossible to eliminate the weariness that accompanies those final weeks of school, the days leading up to that point are certainly less stressful.

Melissa Burnett is a science teacher at Artesia High School and serves as an Ambassador for the New Mexico Teacher Leader Network.

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