Tag: New Mexico

#FamilyFriday – Parents Must Hold Schools Accountable

#FamilyFriday – Parents Must Hold Schools Accountable

#FamilyFriday is a weekly series of voices from the field of families and advocates from across the State of New Mexico. Each Friday, a new voice will be posted. If you would like to submit a blog post for consideration of publication, please submit it to Family.Liaison@state.nm.us. Enjoy and share!

Parents must hold schools accountable

By Bonnie Murphy, School Family Partnership Academy Member

After talking to hundreds of families over the last few months about their children and their school experiences, I have realized that there are just too many schools out there not doing their students and families right, and nobody else is talking about it. New Mexico has laws that tell schools, administrators and teachers how to deliver high quality education for the best interests of the students. We also have Administrative Codes that tell school administrators how to run schools. This gives them a lot of responsibility but a lot of freedom. This definitely isn’t working.

How would I know? My entire working career, since I was 19 years old, has been spent in some form of education, but I have recently left teaching and administration because this project is more important right now. Honestly- knowledge, experience, and training helps, but the key is what I have learned about education through the eyes of parents who tell me story after story of how they think schools have failed their children.

Most parents just want to make it better, not to add drama, embarrassment or backlash for their already struggling children. They are trapped in the boundaries of their district school, so they devise a plan to enroll their child in a different school, tell their child to suck it up or fight back, or try talking to the school about their concerns. Unfortunately, these don’t always solve the problem because parents simply don’t know what they don’t know. However, not all situations end up unresolved for all children and families and not all schools and teachers are failing all children. The key is how educated parents are about school laws and policies and how knowledgeable and honest teachers and school administrators are.

New Mexico just lost a major lawsuit accusing [the state of] inappropriately educating many children. The public blames the New Mexico Public Education Department (NMPED), funding, teacher quality, teacher preparation programs, and the list goes on. These issues are important, but they miss what is actually going on at ground level. The judge in this lawsuit ordered the NMPED to come up with a plan by April, of next year! NMPED has taken definite steps in the right direction and made progress, but it takes time, and there is an election for governor around the corner. I know of so many families who need help with their issues with schools right now. They can’t wait.

The biggest and most positive impact on the education of all youth of New Mexico could be educating and mobilizing the sheer masses of families to keep schools accountable for doing what they are supposed to be doing. There is nobody more concerned about their children’s futures than parents. They just need to know how.

Now, what good would it do for families all over the state to suddenly file a rash of lawsuits and send our schools and Public Education Department into constant fighting and money-draining court battles? Not much, when you really think about it. Parents simply want their children’s schools providing what their children need by following the laws, rules and policies already in place to make their education better, to access needed supports and increase their child’s opportunities. PED should begin more detailed data collection, disclose to the public all schools’ adherence to the laws and policies, and enforce accountability.

My suggestion is for parents to rise up in masses with your tools of knowledge in hand to hold your child’s school accountable. Make sure your child’s school and teachers know that you know what they are supposed to be doing. Parents are going to help change New Mexico’s education history.

 

NOW RECRUITING! NMTLN School Liaison Cohort 2018-2019

NOW RECRUITING! NMTLN School Liaison Cohort 2018-2019

What is the NMTLN?

The purpose of the NMTLN is to develop a set of teacher leaders who:

  • Gain knowledge about PED areas of focus to support student outcomes
  • Serve as their school’s liaison when other teachers have questions about PED areas of focus, such as NMTEACH
  • Provide feedback about PED areas of focus
  • Develop skills to support colleagues’ growth and development
  • Gain access to PED resources and tools

What is a School Liaison?
APPLY HERE NOW!

NMTLN School Liaisons hone their teacher leadership skills and gain knowledge about PED areas of focus and state policy. School Liaisons serve as the on-the-ground go-to person at their school site to help explain PED areas of focus and provide guidance to their colleagues. School Liaisons participate in virtual and regional in-person meetings. (See photos below!)

Who should apply?

Ideal candidates are solutions-oriented individuals who want to learn about state policy, want access to tools and resources to help them hone their craft even further, are continuous learners who seek out and apply feedback to improve, and who have taken or want to take on leadership roles at their school sites. NMTLN School Liaisons participate in the network for one full year, with the option to reapply for a second year.

What specifically do School Liaisons do?

NMTLN Teacher Liaisons is a regional model, where teacher leaders in the network come together with participants in their region two times a year for after-school convenings during the school year. The purpose of the in-person convenings is to collaborate with educators across the region, learn about PED areas of focus, build instructional content and leadership skills through meaningful professional learning opportunities, network with each other, and develop a community of support.

The regional convenings are designed so that participants will not miss class time with students nor need to spend the night. Districts will individually determine reimbursements such as mileage; these costs will not be covered by PED. The in-person convenings are designed to be highest-quality professional learning for teachers; districts will individually determine what type of professional leave teachers can take for participating in the NMTLN School Liaison program.

Additionally, NMTLN Teacher Liaisons participate in monthly webinars in conjunction with other teacher leaders in the state. Content for the in-person convenings and the monthly webinars focuses on PED areas of focus surrounding teaching quality.

***THE BOTTOM LINE: Every teacher should feel empowered to ask questions and share their experiences. You will serve as a point of contact, quite literally liaising between the PED and your fellow teachers. You will have access to resources and information you can share with them, and should they have questions, you will be connected directly to the PED to help them get the answers they need.***

EXPECTATIONS

Date

Virtual Training Session: Topic

Information to register will be sent a few weeks prior to each virtual training session.

*** Dates and topics are subject to change. ***

August 30

Thursday

4:30-5:30 pm

What Can I Expect from this Teacher Leadership Experience?
October 18

Thursday

4:30-5:30 pm

What Does Cultural Competence and Responsiveness Look Like in My Classroom?

 

November 15

Thursday

4:30-5:30 pm

How Does Education Policy Impact Me?
January 17

Thursday

4:30-5:30 pm

What Am I Doing to Engage All Families Effectively?
March 14

Thursday

4:30-5:30 pm

What Do I Need to Know About Supporting My Diverse Learners?
April 11

Thursday

4:30-5:30 pm

How Do I Keep My Students Engaged All Year Long?
May 16

Thursday

4:30-5:30 pm

How Do We Ensure that All Students Are Supported by Our Most Effective Teachers?

Date

Regional Meeting: Location

Plan to attend one regional meeting per round. Choose the location nearest you. Plan to attend all of your required meetings.

Regional Meetings

September 12

September 13

September 19

September 20

September 26

September 27

 

Santa Fe

Las Vegas

Roswell

Las Cruces

Farmington

Albuquerque

Regional Meetings

November 28

November 29

December 5

December 6

December 12

December 13

 

Santa Fe

Las Vegas

Roswell

Las Cruces

Farmington

Albuquerque

Regional Meetings

February 12

February 13

February 19

February 20

February 26

February 27

 

Santa Fe

Las Vegas

Roswell

Las Cruces

Farmington

Albuquerque

What are the benefits of becoming a School Liaison?

Participants gain a unique community of support through the NMTLN, opportunities to network with like-minded teaching professionals and PED staff, and share strategies, methods, and solutions to challenges. This is a voluntary opportunity to gain expertise and skills that will allow you to take on more formal teacher leadership roles. You can use your participation in the network as an artifact for your NMTEACH report.  Most importantly, you will participate in a movement – the first of its kind in New Mexico – to engage with PED and teachers across the state to raise the quality of instruction and outcomes for our students.

So, how do I join?

Follow the link to the form HERE.

Still have questions?

Contact Alicia and Kayli at teacher.liaison@state.nm.us

We can’t wait to hear from you!

-Kayli and Alicia

New Mexico Teacher Spotlight: Tennise Lucas

New Mexico Teacher Spotlight: Tennise Lucas

It is a big world out there, but I tell my students that they can do anything. In the words of Walt Disney, “If you can dream it, you can do it.” My job is not just to teach academics; but to help students navigate their lives while striving for their best.

I am a native Roswellite via Canada. I grew up between living in town and on my grandparents ranch in Lincoln County. This was my first classroom of sorts as I learned how to ride horses, brand cattle, and fix fences. Most of my education was in Roswell. After graduating from high school, several career changes, a bachelor’s degree, and the birth of my world; Echo, I decided to finally commit to teaching. This was not a decision I took lightly. I believe that the cornerstone of our country is our children, and the education they receive is vital.

My intentions were never to become a principal. One of my former superintendents once told me that if I didn’t like how things were going, I needed to be a principal. So, I was given an opportunity and received my leadership training through the National Institute for Student Leadership in conjunction with ENMU. This training was invaluable as it opened my eyes to the necessity for change in our educational system. I received a Master of Education from Lesley University in Cambridge, MA. and my New Mexico Teacher’s Certificate from Eastern New Mexico University. Currently, I am a state representative for my district on the Secretary Teacher Advisory Council and one of the ambassadors for my school. My leadership roles include Superintendent Advisory Council, PD training, a mentor for other teachers, and school based leadership team. I am a fierce advocate for my students and passionate about their learning.

When not in the classroom, I am in a dance room. In 2003, I was an originating instructor of The Studio+. In 2005, I was certified in the discipline of Tap under board certification with the Texas Association Teachers of Dancing, Inc. I continue to work with children through tap and Irish dancing at the studio.

After fifteen years of teaching in both private and public school settings, I am not ready to leave the classroom. I will continue to work for teachers and my students in an attempt to help develop innovative, safe, and effective 21st century learning environments that will foster both academic and emotional well-being.

New Mexico Teacher Spotlight: Monica Nunez

New Mexico Teacher Spotlight: Monica Nunez

I walk into my classroom everyday with the drive to inspire my students to set high expectations for themselves. With hard work and dedication, they can dream big and find their own success.

Being the first high school graduate in my family was a major accomplishment. Without the support of teachers and faculty at Santa Teresa High School, I would not have been able to graduate at the top 5% of my class, with a full academic scholarship.  This is my purpose for teaching at the same high school that I graduated from. I want to be that teacher that inspires students to find their own future success.

At New Mexico State University I received a Bachelor’s Degree in Education and a Master’s Degree in Curriculum & Instruction. One of my goals was always to return to my community to help students like myself.   I have been working as a teacher for 12 years now.  During my time at Gadsden Independent School District I have provided not just the teaching of subjects, but I have also guided my students towards setting and achieving their own future goals.

Teaching has always been a passion. I taught fourth grade for seven years at Santa Teresa Elementary.  During this time, I was able to be a part of a strong community that involved teachers, parents, and students.  By working hard we received a National Blue Ribbon Schools Award in 2010 by former President Barack Obama.  We were the first school from Gadsden Independent School District to receive this distinction.

As a science teacher at Santa Teresa High School, I continue to challenge my students and help them set goals to graduate. I am always looking for opportunities to broaden my students’ experiences.  I want them to see the world that exists outside of our community.

Some of my recognitions for teaching have been a TRIO New Mexico State Alumni Achiever Award and a National Geographic Grosvenor Teacher Fellowship. As part of the fellowship, I worked with National Geographic by taking an expedition to Antarctica.  I was then able to share this experience with my students, school and local community.  This experience has broaden my own perspective of the world and how to teach my own students beyond our beautiful Chihuahuan Desert.

I always dreamed of going to the white continent. As a teacher, I was able to accomplish my dream.  My purpose as a teacher is to have students see me as a source of inspiration to accomplish their own dreams.  I always tell my students that if I can accomplish my dreams, they can, too.

Your 2018 New Mexico Teacher of the Year, Ivonne Orozco

Your 2018 New Mexico Teacher of the Year, Ivonne Orozco

From The 2018 New Mexico Teacher of the Year: The Year of Educators’ Voices Rising

As your 2018 New Mexico Teacher of the Year, I am honored to be one of your teacher-leader voices. The diversity amongst us in New Mexico is an asset. My family immigrated here from Mexico when I was 12-years-old. I was an English language learner in middle school and later took honors courses in high school, I ran cross country and track, and I graduated in the top 10% of my class. I am a proud UNM graduate. Go Lobos! But I did not get here alone: I had teachers and family that set core foundations along my journey that contributed to my success. These included: high expectations, staying the course, building a strong voice, and valuing teachers and education.

Every day in my classroom, I keep in mind that all students can be successful no matter where they traveled from to get here in the morning, or how much money their parents have, or how much they still have to learn. I keep my expectations high. It’s unclear why there’s still a misconception out there that students facing challenges at home can’t succeed at school. That is false. Lowering standards for any of our kids is a disservice. They deserve high-quality standards, options, and teachers. My mission for my students at Public Academy for Performing Arts (PAPA) in Albuquerque is to make sure they achieve high academic standards while pursuing artistic excellence.

Staying the course is critical to long-term success in life and in our public education system. As a young teacher, I have witnessed the distress caused by constantly changing systems. Every few years things change with exams, evaluations, and leadership just as we start to adjust. I won’t be complacent when provided the opportunity to sit at the table with policymakers on this issue. I do not have all the answers, but I know that teachers in our state,

who work hard and are passionate about their students, do have collective answers. In my role representing the state’s teachers, I will be a conduit of teacher voices in those conversations.

One way I have decided to take a stance on my beliefs is by using my voice. For far too long, teachers’ voices have not been properly represented. But in recent years, the New Mexico Public Education Department has created opportunities with a Teacher-Leader Network which includes the School Liaison Program, the NM Dream Team, and the Secretary’s Teacher Advisory. I have taken part in these programs and they are creating a network for passionate teachers to advance student learning, learn more about policy, and express concerns. We are leading the nation with this work and we must sustain it.

We must also focus on recruiting the next generation of teachers. Many teachers work within 20 miles of where they attended high school, which means tomorrow’s teachers are sitting right in front of us today. We must show our students the rewards and gratification of being a teacher. Many of my students see themselves in me and I take that very seriously as I continue to be an advocate for my profession and for them. They deserve hope.

As a Dreamer, I know how important it is to know that someone is fighting in your corner. I will continue to stand up for my community and future generations in the fight for a permanent solution for DACA recipients. I want to thank Secretary Christopher Ruszkowski and the PED for giving me this role and platform and for recognizing my work in cultivating student achievement growth.

I hope I am a reflection of the beautiful diversity of our state. I hope that students and teachers can see themselves in me. I have and will continue to give you my all for the remainder of 2018, demonstrating that educator voices like mine are truly on the rise in New Mexico. I will see you throughout 2018!

Preparing “Day-One Ready” Teachers

Preparing “Day-One Ready” Teachers

Preparing “Day-One Ready” Teachers

By Elizabeth Long, English Language Arts Teacher, Gallup Middle School

Teacher quality is fundamental to improving public education.  If not one of the most important factors to school success, then what is?  There is a lot of talk about how to improve schools—and improving instruction should be at the top of the list.

And the effect of quality teachers is greatest among students with the most educational disadvantages (Goldhaber, 2016, p. 58). It is no secret that quality teachers matter and can change the course of our students’ lives. Still, for far too many teachers, those that can change lives, leave the profession after just a first few years of teaching.

I wanted to be a teacher since I was in first grade, and while that may sound cliché’, it often takes an entire lifetime to prepare a person to be an effective teacher. Even the best teacher prep programs cannot adequately prepare a teacher for everything that they will experience in the classroom. Still, teachers need to come to the classroom “Day One Ready”, and that goes beyond just knowing how to lesson plan or memorize learning theories.

Teacher preparation programs have a solemn responsibility to produce quality teachers.

After my first year of teaching, I was ready to give up on the dream I had since I was a little girl. It was devastating. I was not adequately prepared for my first year of teaching, and while I am sure many factors can be taken into account when it comes to my lack of preparedness that first year in the classroom, I was not prepared well through my college teacher prep program.

Luckily, I chose to stay in the classroom and use resources within my school to push myself to my full potential (I earned an Exemplary rating this year as a teacher in Gallup, New Mexico). Unfortunately, not every teacher has access to the resources I had or the resolve to keep pushing internally.  And that is how we lose potentially life-changing teachers.

However, if teacher preparation programs dramatically improve in New Mexico, then the quality of teaching, and thus education, across the state will improve.

The purpose of my writing this is not to demonize or condemn any specific college or university. As a teacher, I believe a large part of learning is in our own hands.  We must accept personal responsibility for our craft, and for our students’ learning.  In fact, the summer after my first (rough) year of teaching, I went back to the basics. I ordered Harry Wong’s classic books about classroom management, and I read his words as if they were scripture.

One may ask, didn’t I do the same in my teacher prep program? The answer is sort of, yes – I read many of the famous teaching texts and theories, but what was often missing was the application of those theories. Without a classroom of my own, or a classroom to visualize myself in it was hard to imagine how to put these theories into action. For example, I took a special education course about foundational theories, but I never actually learned what special education would look like in a real school or a real classroom. What I was learning in my classes were the idealistic theories for teaching, and when it was time for my student teaching experience it seemed as though what I had learned had no basis in reality.

The best classes I had were with teachers who were passionate about the teaching practice and not completely disconnected from the classroom experience itself. It is not that I did not have some great courses or professors along the way, but the problem is often cohesion and consistency, and my classes were, to be honest, hit or miss.

I was also shocked by how inadequately I was prepared for the student diversity I would experience. Many universities give a “cookie-cutter” view on teaching English Language Learners (ELLs) and culturally relevant teaching. There was no connection to New Mexico and our students. According to Gist, “If teachers have limited knowledge of students’ cultural and linguistic backgrounds, this can severely reduce the teacher’s ability to draw upon a student’s cultural and linguistic strengths and foster resilient student identities of achievement”. New Mexico and our students have unique needs, and these must be addressed in teacher prep programs, and we need to address diversity while never lowering he bar for any student, regardless of background.

Another frustrating experience is that I often felt like I was given misleading information about licensure, advisement, and what steps I needed to take to ensure I received my licensure after graduation with the proper credentials. Any preparation program requires quality advisement, and teachers need advisors who know their state’s expectations on testing and certification.

I have mentored many teachers over the years, and I have seen many come and go. I would say that, in my experience, teacher preparation program experiences directly correlate with whether teachers stay in the profession or quit after their first year.  As we all know, there are some tough issues in education today, and teaching is not a laid-back job in any way.

Still, if teachers come into the classroom “Day One Ready”, their entire outlook on teaching may change…but what does “Day One Ready” even mean?

“Day One Ready” means that a teacher is not surprised, but prepared for what they walk into that first day in the classroom. It is not about creating perfect teachers, but rather, teachers that will be prepared for the highlights and challenges of teaching our students, with proper support along the way. “Day One Ready” teachers are confident that the experiences in their teacher preparation program will realistically align with their true classroom experience. While nothing may prepare teachers for everything they will experience, quality programs prepare them to be more ready than I was.

Let us help prepare teachers realistically in high quality teacher preparation programs, which means that these programs should be held accountable, should increase their student teaching experiences, and should align their programs much more closely with state and district expectations. Then, we can help teachers reach their full potential and truly change the lives of students across the State. We know that, more than anything, teacher quality correlates with student success. So certainly teacher preparation is the foundation of that idea.

I am thankful I decided to keep teaching. Even with the most professionally challenging experiences, it is one of the most rewarding jobs in the world.  And I have my students’ academic growth and their changed life trajectories to show for it!

However, if I could have been better trained and prepared to be more successful on Day One, then it should have happened. No excuses.

Building Social Studies Materials and New Forms of Teacher Collaboration

Building Social Studies Materials and New Forms of Teacher Collaboration

The most valuable part of the Social Studies Dream Team “TeachFest” experience is the opportunity to step out of one’s own bubble and to interact with colleagues from around the state. The sheer breadth and depth of experience, both personal and professional, was both humbling and inspiring.  There were people from all over the country, whose experience ranged from business owner to Peace Corps volunteer, from law enforcement officer to U.S. AID worker—all of whom have chosen to work as teachers in New Mexico.  The ice breakers and conversation starters at the beginning helped foster a sense of community and shared purpose, which laid the foundation for productive collaborations.

I did my teaching certificate work at the University of Houston and have been teaching for 21 years—first in southwest Houston for three years, and now in Albuquerque since 2000. I teach all areas of social studies, but primarily government and AP Government.  I was the AP Lead teacher at Cibola High for the past 3-4 years.  My teaching partner and I were the first in the state to pilot the AP Capstone program.  I also teach a little beginning French when needed, and I currently co-author or co-edit 2 AP review books for McGraw Hill Publishing, Co. (5 Steps to a 5…AP World and AP European History).  As such, I set the bar high for all my students.

I think it is important for us as teachers to step outside our comfort zones, and to recognize that our profession extends beyond our classroom walls, our department and our school. At the Dream Team TeachFest, teachers from the largest high schools in Albuquerque swapped stories with teachers from tiny rural K-8 schools.  It was quite the exchange of ideas!  To gain a broader perspective regarding the challenges facing teachers across the state is to become more understanding and tolerant, much like the character education we do as social studies teachers.  And we had guest speakers with a range of perspectives as well: the Teacher Liaisons from the PED and remarks from Debra Marquez and Anthony Burns from the PED’s Instructional Materials Bureau served to reinforce the idea that we are part of education policy in a larger context, and that our influence can extend beyond our classroom.

Teaching can be a solitary profession, and for years the only way to extend our influence beyond the classroom was to leave the classroom. It is gratifying to see that there are now ways for teachers to expand their impact while still remaining teachers.  The fact that the PED Secretary-Designate Ruszkowski took the time to come to the event and listen to teachers’ concerns underscores the idea that we can and should look beyond our classrooms.  Though we may not always agree with his answers in-full, that he would take the time to have the discussion as a fellow social studies teacher is, in itself, a step in the right direction.  We need more dialogue, not less.

As new members of the Dream Team, the scope of the required lessons seemed overwhelming at first, but as the presenters and facilitators walked us through the process our ideas began to take shape. Our project facilitator was an effective sounding board for ideas and concerns, but also kept the conversations fun at the same time.  Though it took some time for us to develop a project appropriate in scope, we left with a clear picture of what tasks remained.  Despite our differences and our diversity of interests, the fact that everyone there had given up his or her time for the common purpose of creating something beneficial for New Mexican students is reassuring.

We will create materials that every social studies teacher around the state can use, but the idea of teacher-leadership in social studies and beyond, fostered by Cohort 2 of the New Mexico Dream Team, has possibilities far beyond that.

Teacher Spotlight: Stephanie Gurule-Leyba

Teacher Spotlight: Stephanie Gurule-Leyba


Every one of my students has a story.  I believe that by inspiring and elevating my students, their stories will be heard.  My motto: Listen, Learn, and Lead!

Stephanie Gurule-Leyba was raised in Las Vegas, New Mexico and is in her 22nd year at Capital High School in the Santa Fe Public Schools. She is a Project Lead the Way Biomedical Sciences certified teacher and teaches in the Medical Science Academy, a five-course STEAM-H pathway and is also the founder of Scrub Club, a three-summer STEAM-H enrichment program for 4th through 8th grade students. Stephanie is licensed in K-12 Science, Special Education, and Rehabilitation Counseling. She is currently working on her Ph.D. in Education with an emphasis in Learning, Instruction, and Innovation.  Stephanie is a graduate of Robertson High School in Las Vegas and has always admired her teachers, including her father, for really instilling in her life lessons that she shares with her students. She discovered that she enjoyed working with students and had exciting ideas that she wanted to share. Stephanie is very passionate about STEAM-H and career readiness and as a teacher she has the opportunity to share that passion with her students.

Stephanie believes that the job of a teacher does not end when the bell rings for the day. Everyday we teach, encourage, instruct, mentor, praise, influence, guide and inspire. Those who say, “Teaching is easy,” have never been a teacher. Those who say, “Teaching is not rewarding,” have never been a teacher. But, if these same people were to see and experience students’ intellectual growth, maturity, and an ownership of their learning, many would agree that teaching is the most fulfilling job because you have molded the mind and touched the heart of a student forever. Our students need to understand that they will never finish what they started. They will always be learning. It is important that we instill a culture of learning with our students and with their families and community. We are all teachers and our students are our future.

The relationships we build with our students is the key to their success; but student success is also reliant on the relationships that are built with our families and communities. Many look to teachers as those who are supposed to educate our children, but it is important that we work together in educating and raising our children to prepare them for their future. One person cannot do it alone; it takes a community to raise a child.

Free New Mexico Magazine Subscription for Teachers and Our Students

Free New Mexico Magazine Subscription for Teachers and Our Students

Great news! New Mexico Magazine just launched a program called Subscriptions for Students. With this offer any New Mexico teacher can request a free subscription for their class.

Rachel Dennis, a history teacher at Jackson Middle School in Albuquerque has shared this guest post about how she has used this program in her classroom. Enjoy!

I love teaching and I love New Mexico! Both things I carry on from my mom, a retired APS teacher, who just so happened to be my 7th grade New Mexico history teacher. When I was younger, we spent weekends as a family traveling around the state checking out all the wonderful and unique places New Mexico has to offer.

When I started teaching New Mexico history 9 years ago it amazed me how many of my students had never explored their state, let alone even been outside of Albuquerque. This realization is where New Mexico Magazine really got its initial appeal, and why I’ve been so excited to be a pilot class for the new Subscriptions for Students Program. Now that my students have their own copies of the magazine, they love looking at the pictures of the people, places and art that we are studying and are surprised to see how these wonderful things are right in their own backyard. The images were the initial grab to get the students’ attention, but what I’ve found is that the articles they are reading in the magazine can be so easily tied into our curriculum and standards.

As a school this year we really wanted to focus on informational text, and New Mexico Magazine lends the most perfect pieces of writing for my students to analyze. We do a monthly (at least) assignment with the articles, marking the text using AVID strategies, analyzing author’s purpose and looking at cause and effect pieces of the stories.

I am so grateful to New Mexico Magazine for providing each of my students with a monthly subscription! The magazine is influencing their lives and has added a new level to my teaching. I am proud to be piloting the Subscriptions for Students Program. I love that I am able to bring the community into my classroom and share it with the students, who can then share with their families as well! I plan to continue to utilize the magazine in my curriculum to help further their reading, writing and analysis skills.

I strongly encourage all my fellow teachers to adopt and use this program in their classrooms! I really want to see this program succeed, not only so I can keep using this as a tool in my classroom for years to come, but to share the success with lots of other students in our state!

To request the Subscriptions for Students Program for your class, send an email to circ@nmmagazine.com or call 505-827-6387.