Tag: Professional Development

CTE and STEM Conferences Available to You

CTE and STEM Conferences Available to You

National Conference Comes to Albuquerque!

The Association for Career & Technical Education (ACTE) Best Practices and Innovations Conference will be in New Mexico this year. It will be held at the Hotel Albuquerque September 27-29, 2017. If CTE leaders are unable to attend the entire event, there will also be a half-day New Mexico CTE Summit Friday afternoon.

ACTE Best Practices & Innovations Conference https://www.acteonline.org/bestpractices/#.WZHDAU32aUk

Learn about ACTE Professional Membership https://www.acteonline.org/

Engineering, Computer Science, & Biomedical Sciences…Oh My!

The 2017 Project Lead The Way (PLTW) State Conference will be held September 15, 2017 at the Hyatt Regency Tamaya Resort and Spa for current or interested PLTW educators and leaders. Learn more and register for this STEM/CTE learning event.

Register for the NM Conference https://engr.nmsu.edu/nmpltw/2017-nm-pltw-state-conference/

Learn about National PLTW Curriculum https://www.pltw.org/


For questions, contact Bobbi Eichhorst at Barbara.Eichhorst@state.nm.us.

 

Istation Professional Development for the 2017-2018 School Year

Istation Professional Development for the 2017-2018 School Year

To continue supporting districts and charters K-3 in the implementation and use of IStation data in supporting improving reading outcomes for students, PED will be hosting regional half-day trainings.  Training this year will be provided in two-strands, one supporting principals and district leaders, and one strand for educators focusing on how Istation assists in closing the achievement gap.

Teacher Professional Development –Round 1- August/Sept. 2017

Using Istation Tools for Effective Small Group and Differentiated Instruction

This session will incorporate a short refresher of ISIP assessments and then focus on progress monitoring and intervention. Participants will use data to form effective small groups and use Istation Teacher Tools to support differentiated instruction.  Please bring fully charged technology devices and your Istation username and password.

Each day will provide two sessions: 8:30-11:30am and 1:00-4:00pm.  To register, please click the link below for the training you wish to attend:

Date Location Registration Link
8.28, 29, 30, 2017 Albuquerque IStation for Teachers 8.28, 8.29, 8.30 Albuquerque
8.31.2017 Las Vegas IStation for Teachers 8.31.17 – Las Vegas
9.6.2017 Las Cruces IStation for Teachers 9.6.17 Las Cruces
9.7.2017 Artesia Istation for Teachers 9.7.17 Artesia
9.11.2017 Gallup IStation for Teachers 9.11.17 Gallup

 

Principals/Administrators Professional Development –Round 1- Sept. 2017

Using Istation Reports for Accountability and Instructional Decision Making

This session provides administrators an overview of Istation’s fundamental components as well as a basic working knowledge of key management reports, to get the most out of your ISIP implementation.  At the conclusion of this session, administrators will have had a chance to review reports for accountability and campus/district progress, as well as decision making.  Please bring fully charged technology devices and your Istation username and password.

Each day will provide two sessions: 8:30-11:30am and 1:00-4:00pm.  To register, please click the link below for the training you wish to attend:

Date Location Registration Link
9.6.2017 Albuquerque IStation for Administrators 9.6.17 – Albuquerque
9.7.2017 Las Vegas Istation for Administrator 9.7.17 Las Vegas
9.11.2017 Artesia Istation for Administrators 9.11.17 Artesia
9.12.2017 Gallup IStation for Administrators 9.12.17 Gallup
9.13.2017 Las Cruces IStation for Administrators 9.13.17 Las Cruces

 

Please share the information with your schools.  If you have questions, contact Michael Miller, Literacy Director, at michael.miller2@state.nm.us or at 505-827-6567.

Top 10 Highlights of the NM Teacher Summit

Top 10 Highlights of the NM Teacher Summit

In case you missed it, June 26th and 27th marked our Second Annual NM Teacher Summit. The event was huge success with 1,000 teachers from all over the state coming together to celebrate one another and continue to grow in their craft and career.

Check out the 10 Ten things about the 2nd Annual Teacher Summit:

  1. 1,000 attendees

    This year, the summit grew to 3x the size of last year. It was a true joy to see 1,000 teachers gathered full of positivity and excitement! Two years ago, the Secretary’s Teacher Advisory said they wanted a summer conference, we would never have dreamed that just two years later we’d be standing on stage looking at a crowd of 1,000 teachers!

  2. Improved Communication

    In my role, I often hear from teachers that they feel “out of the loop”. I had many conversations over two days in which teachers said they finally feel like they know what is going on and feel included in the path ahead!

  3. Acting Secretary Ruszkowski’s first keynote address

    It was great to see Acting Secretary Ruszkowski deliver his first ever keynote address as Acting Secretary during the Summit’s opening session and to learn more about his personal story and passion for education. Later, he spent time in small group sessions with teachers answering tough questions with finesse and commitment. Teachers really enjoyed meeting one on one.

  4. New Teacher Leader Opportunities

    We shared so many opportunities for teachers to be change agents for education in New Mexico at the Summit. Teach Plus shared their application for the 2nd cohort of the New Mexico Teach Plus Fellowship. The New Mexico Literacy Dream Team shared the 36 close reading lesson plans and announced the launch of the 2nd New Mexico Dream Team which will focus on Social Studies. Stay tuned for the application. We also announced the expansion of the New Mexico Teacher Leader Network and the 2nd Cohort of the Secretary’s Teacher Advisory. The 2nd Cohort of the STA will be selected by the end of the month and the application with for the expansion of the New Mexico Teacher Leader Network will be out this Fall.

  5. Empowered Teachers 

    Through the course of the conference we were able to see teachers realize that they have so much power to impact change for their students and schools. I really enjoyed watching teachers lean into their power as teachers and begin to empower others.

  6. Secretary Skandera’s Final Interview with Romy Drucker from The 74 Million

    Although her last day on the job was June 20th, Secretary Skandera was present at the New Mexico Teacher Summit and did a final interview with the CEO of the online education site, The 74 Million, Romy Drucker. Secretary Skandera reflected on her time in New Mexico, shared her lessons learned, and thanked the teachers for attending and creating so many opportunities for teachers to be equipped, empowered and championed.

  7. National Teacher of the Year Sydney Chaffee 

    It was such an honor to have the National Teacher of the Year, Sydney Chaffee, join us for the Summit. Sydney delivered the keynote address at our celebration dinner on night 1 of the summit. During her keynote, Sydney talked about the power of teacher voice and encouraged all teachers to get involved.

  8. More than 36 awesome break out sessions

    PED Staff and external partners came together to host more than 36 breakout sessions on everything form iStation and PARCC, to Teacher Evaluation and School Grades, small group sessions with Acting Secretary Ruszkowski and focus groups on new literacy programs. We also had sessions on Teacher Leader opportunities, Curriculum and Lesson Planning and so much more. All sessions were kicked off by a teacher leader, which was a great way to highlight their effort and commitment.

  9. #NMTeacherSummit

    We had a blast following teacher’s favorite moments and take-aways on Twitter. Participants were encouraged to interact using #NMTeacherSummit allowing others to follow along.

  10. Teachers Leading

    Our teacher leaders were in force at the Summit. They introduced every break out session, introduced every keynote speakers, led teacher shout outs from the stage and assisted their colleagues. Some of our teacher leaders even led break out sessions. This was truly our vision come to life. Teachers equipping, empowering and championing their peers. It was the highlight of my career to watch it unfold.

The NM Teacher Summit equipped, empowered, and championed our teachers, but don’t take my word for it. Check out what teachers had to say about the event:

Santa Fe Teacher

I had an amazing time these past two days! I truly believe that we are on a positive path in New Mexico! 

Las Cruces Teacher

The Summit made me realize I need to get out of my comfort zone after 28 years of teaching. I can’t wait to get the STA application in my hand, and if that doesn’t work out, I’ll apply for the School Liaison. There is so much work to be done, and I want to be part of it!!! 

Albuquerque Teacher

This girl is on FIRE! Based on two of the breakout sessions, I have revamped my first two weeks of lessons. Inquiry based life science with argumentation discussions based on Claim, Evidence, and Reasoning. I am so excited! Also, I’m hoping to take these ideas back to my site and share with my colleagues. Between the STEM Symposium and The Summit, I am fired up! Thank you NMPED and our teacher leaders! 

Artesia Teacher

It was so enjoyable to spend two days in such a positive atmosphere. 

Texico Teacher

I have of being a part of something so incredibly dynamic and motivating! From the beginning to the end, I felt that I was involved in something transformative and inspired. The general sessions were all inclusive and uniting, and the break outs supported so many varied personal interests. The two days were uplifting and affirming as an educator. I feel valued and respected, heard and recognized, and most of all, championed. 

We hope to see you at next year’s Teacher Summit! Date to come soon!

To find resources and presentations from the teacher summit click here.

GUEST POST: How the NM Teacher Summit Changed My Summer Plans

GUEST POST: How the NM Teacher Summit Changed My Summer Plans

I can’t seem to come down from the past few days. This is a strange feeling for me because June is usually a month characterized by lounging on the couch, starting (and hopefully finishing) house projects that have gone undone since Christmas break, and consciously releasing the stressful moments and memories of my teaching year.  No matter how wonderful the school year has been for me, I invariably need this complete break from it and from almost everything educational. At least that is how I have managed to get through the last ten years.

Granted, when I was a new teacher I had that eager, overachiever thirst for new knowledge. Over the past 26 years that “newness” has worn off and I have learned to pace myself, never teach summer school, and stay in my robe until noon. I am one of those teachers who needs the full 10 weeks of summer vacation to rejuvenate. Come Labor Day, I am back in full force and signing up for everything extra-curricular and then some. I push myself non-stop, just not in June. Let’s face it: I’ve been doing this a long time, and I only have so much energy to go around.

So imagine how surprised I was to return from the Second Annual NM Teacher Summit last night with an energy usually reserved for September. I literally couldn’t subdue the enthusiasm and joy I felt as I drove back from Albuquerque to Taos. The landscape looked crisper and the sunset brighter. What just happened to me?

I now realize how I have isolated myself professionally over the last decade. I admit, I have a good thing going. I love my school, my director, my colleagues, and my students. I have a fabulous view of Taos Mountain from my window, and my commute is 1-1/2 miles. Life is good….and easy. Online professional development and collaboration with brilliant coworkers is all I need. Or so I thought.

It’s easy to self-isolate in a large landmass state such as New Mexico. When I taught in New England states and even in coastal Virginia, there was always a district or city nearby where teachers shared information, conferenced, and supported each other. I didn’t remember until this week in Albuquerque how much I had missed that. To be in a convention center ballroom with 1,000 of my peers was exhilarating. To hear our New Mexico Public Education Department thank us for our work and inspire us to push ourselves to greater heights was nothing short of awe-inspiring.

I attended break-out sessions where I learned how PED is working to improve education in New Mexico, met old and new teacher friends, and celebrated accomplishments in New Mexico schools. I gained a better appreciation for the vision and efforts of former Secretary Skandera to effect change for New Mexico students, and for the energy of the new Acting Secretary Christopher Ruszkowski to continue to work to equip and empower teachers in order to make that happen. It wasn’t long before I remembered why I chose this great profession and how much I still love teaching. In my self-imposed isolation, I sometimes forget that truth.

The best part for me: seeing a friend and former colleague who I mentored when she was a new teacher. She was able to attend just part of the Summit because she attends MBA classes to  become an educational leader in her home city of Albuquerque. Oh, and one of my former third grade students performed for the teachers in an incredible display of her drama skills developed at New Mexico School for the Arts where she will be a high school senior. The rewards of being a teacher always come back to the kids!

So I’m back to my problem of figuring out how to come down from this unexpected high. While I honor my physical and emotional need to stay away from the classroom during the summer, I might sneak in some educational reading from one of the many titles shared at the Summit. My boss and I agreed to read Simon Sinek’s Start with Why next month, and I’m excited to reread Mindset: The New Psychology of Success by Carol Dweck. The Summit not only connected me to friends and specific strategies for furthering my practice, but it made me want to expand my big picture of education while I have the time to start and finish a book. This is the first June in YEARS where I actually look forward to thinking about educational topics and themes. Forgive me if I do it in my robe on the couch.

This guest post was written by Leslie Baker, a teacher at Taos Charter School in Taos, NM and member of the New Mexico Teacher Leader Network.

GUEST POST: Teachers as Leaders, Yes We Can!

GUEST POST: Teachers as Leaders, Yes We Can!

When I first heard the modern iteration of the term ‘Teacher Leadership’ at the National Board’s annual Teaching and Learning Conference, my first cynical thought was, “Here They go again… trying to get us to do more work for less money.”   Three years later, I’ve come to believe strongly that teacher leadership is the key to creating a modern, effective American educational system.

Like many experienced teachers, I was a teacher leader before that became a catch phrase.  Almost 20 years ago, I was lucky enough to be a part of a cadre of ‘Literacy Leaders’ in my district.  There were 12 of us.  Our mission was to disseminate the research on how to teach reading.  It was exciting to be a part of this cohort and it was exciting to bring the teachers at my school together for the first time to discuss our practice and how to make it better.  The week-long summer training I led changed the culture at our school from one of isolation to one of collaboration.

Teachers volunteer at their schools because they want to help their peers be the best they can be for the good of their students.  Often these leaders move on into administrative positions because that is the only opportunity they see to extend their reach.  Many feel the need to expand their impact by formalizing their authority. Unfortunately, too many of these teacher leaders are unhappy in their roles as administrators.  They miss the life of the classroom.  They don’t feel their new roles give them the access they hoped for.  And they are right.  Teachers are more often influenced to improve their practice by other teachers whom they trust and respect.

This is where the true power of teacher leadership lies. Great teachers who improve collaborative practices within schools impact instruction far more than the conventional professional development.  The support that is most needed to improve their teaching is much more involved and intimate than the typical teacher training session.  Strong teachers, who receive training in coaching and adult learning theory, as well as, leading collaborative teams, can help build a culture of ongoing collaborative learning and professional practice in schools.  In this way highly effective teachers can lead courageous change leading to remarkable improvement in student learning.

Since ‘teacher leadership’ has become a movement, there are now a variety of models of teacher leadership around the country.  One is the hybrid role, where teachers teach part of the day and mentor or coach the other part.  In Albuquerque Public Schools, some teacher leaders are full time school-based Instructional Coaches.  Recently, organizations such as Teach Plus and Educators for Excellence have recruited exceptional educators and supported them in influencing policy and school reform in their states.  Teach Plus Fellows recently and successfully advocated for changes to our evaluation system.  The Secretary of Education’s Teacher Advisory is another such advocacy group that the PED started last year.  Both programs will be seeking applicants for new cohorts this summer. Other teachers seek advanced training or National Board Certification and work to help others achieve the same.  Perhaps the most powerful example of teacher leadership has been in the ‘Teacher Led Schools’ movement that has so far been stunningly successful.

New Mexico started its own innovative teacher leadership initiative with the Teacher Leader Network. This network began with 50 high performing teachers who went through a rigorous selection process.  They are brought together in person for 5 full day leadership trainings.  They take part in monthly webinars so they are kept abreast of current information from the the Public Education Department so that they can share it directly with their peers.  The state Public Education Department plans to expand this program so that every school in New Mexico has a designated teacher leader as part of the network.  As a tool for communication, this could yield powerful dividends, especially if the people who lead the Public Education Department make it a venue for not only dispersing information but also as a way to find out what teachers really need and want from our education leaders.  As a way to improve instruction among the rank and file, this network could have profound impact if the teacher leaders are able build trust, and establish collaborative processes in their schools.

If you are a teacher who wants to see some changes in our system, get involved!  Stay on the lookout for opportunities to apply for fellowships and leadership positions.  These opportunities are becoming increasingly more common.  Become National Board Certified, our state is one of the few in which you can receive a healthy stipend for this important achievement.  National Board Certification can open other doors as a leader in our profession.  If you are already National Board Certified consider attending our spring Leadership and advocacy training that will take place in Albuquerque in early June.

My own journey as a teacher leader taught me that teachers in New Mexico still need way more support than they generally receive. They feel powerless to change some of the circumstances within which they work, which leads to increased stress and a too high attrition rate.  In the fall, I will be working towards a Master’s Degree in Educational Policy so I can increase the capacity of teacher leaders in New Mexico. Investing in teacher leaders who create more support for teachers is money well spent.  As teacher leaders we can and must raise our voices to influence public policy in support of our teachers and our schools.

Growth Opportunities and Resources for Teachers

Growth Opportunities and Resources for Teachers

Take a look at these exciting opportunities and share with your colleagues. Please let me know if you have any questions.

Your Liaison,
Alicia Duran-505.467.9985
teacher.liaison@state.nm.us

Engineering Energy Day: April 29, 2017 in Albuquerque

Event website: http://www.nmmesa.org/event/unm-school-of-engineering-science-day-extravaganza/

Engineering Energy Day 04.29.17.PNG

4th Annual STEM Symposium: June 1-2, 2017 in Albuquerque

The Math and Science Bureau at the Public Education Department (PED) is hosting:The 4th Annual STEM Symposium: Growing as a STEM Leader June 1–2, 2017 at the Embassy Suites, Albuquerque for NM Public K–12 science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) teachers.Featuring sessions in the following strands:

  • Improving STEM Instruction;
  • Promoting Equity and Access in STEM Learning;
  • Building Community STEM Partnerships;
  • Teacher Leadership in STEM

The Math and Science Bureau of the PED invites you to participate in the STEM Symposium. As a participating teacher, you will benefit from strategies to innovate you lessons; integrate science, math and ELA practices throughout the curriculum and inspire your students to succeed in STEM while receiving 12 hours of professional development!

Teacher Qualifications

  • Elementary teachers who teach math and science as part of their instruction.
  • Grade 7–12 teachers whose majority of course assignments are science, technology, engineering or mathematics
  • Have a valid NM teaching license and teach in a public district or charter.

Through the STEM Teacher Initiative, the PED will pay travel stipends for qualifying teachers from districts and charters farther than 50 miles from Albuquerque. The travel stipend will be provided at the conclusion of the symposium.

Please register at the following link STEM Symposium Registration. Open registration is available through May 19, 2017.

We look forward to seeing you at the 2017 NM STEM Symposium! For more information, visit the Southwest Regional Educational Cooperative website at www.swrecnm.org.

Student Behavior Workshop: June 19, 2017 in Albuquerque

Student Behavior Workshop 06.19.17.

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER ONLINE

Note: This training always fills up quickly.  You’ll be placed on a wait list if your registration is received after the session fills.  We always recommend registering as soon as possible!

Can’t attend the live simulation training?  Click here to access the 90 min. online training that you can view anytime/anywhere.  This video training will provide you

with the same powerful techniques that you can use in your classroom that day!  Here’s a sample of what teachers and administrators say after the training…

Grants for Teachers Working with Refugee Students: DEADLINE FRIDAY APRIL 21

Education First is seeking applications for teacher-led projects that foster social-emotional skills in students in grades PK-12. Education First is seeking proposals that specifically support students who are new arrivals (such as refugees) or immigrants and English language learners.  After a successful inaugural year in 2016, Education First is continuing the Innovation in Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) Awards for a second year as part of our work with NoVo Foundation and Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors. They will award up to $5,000 to individual teachers or groups of teachers to implement the project in their classrooms and schools in the 2017-18 school year. Awardees will also have the opportunity to present their work to a group of national SEL practitioners, experts and advocates at a convening in October 2017.

New this year, Education First is also looking for applications from districts and charters to support social-emotional learning in students grades PK-12. We will award up to $25,000 per year for applications selected for district-wide work.

Please forward widely to your networks locally and nationwide – Education First is hoping to fund the best practices and ideas in classrooms, schools and districts and provide support where it is needed most. The RFP and application materials can be found here. The deadline for applications is Friday, April 21 at 11:59pm PT. If you’d like to read about last year’s winners, the full list can be found here.

News & Resources from UNC’s Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute

Check out these teacher resources at http://fpg.unc.edu/news/research-and-resources-new-edition-fpg-enews.

GUEST POST: REFLECTIONS ON THE 2016 TEACHER SUMMIT

GUEST POST: REFLECTIONS ON THE 2016 TEACHER SUMMIT

There is no question that the last few years in education — with their myriad of changes in standards, testing and teaching evaluations, and all the debates that went with them — have sometimes made teachers feel hard pressed to stay on top of everything being asked of them.

Through it all, we used each other as sounding boards for ideas on how to adopt Common Core, how to prepare kids for PARCC and for how to upload those NMTeach artifacts. And we also did plenty of griping about those responsible (read Secretary Hanna Skandera).

So when I found out about the recent New Mexico Teacher Summit and that it would provide the opportunity to ask some of the burning questions that have come up over the last few years, I jumped at the chance. And I was not disappointed.

No, I didn’t convince Secretary Skandera to dump the evaluation system or get rid of EOCs. But I did find out that she and her staff are open to, and actually want, feedback from teachers in order to improve those systems.

In every session I attended, from NMTeach 101 to an introduction to the federal Every Student Succeeds Act, our presenters invited questions and did their best to answer them honestly. And they didn’t sugarcoat the problems or why they chose their solutions. I also got the chance to hear from tons of smart, talented teachers from across the state. It was clear they care about kids and want our schools to serve them better.

I also learned more about the Secretary’s Teacher Advisory, a group of 17 teachers from across New Mexico who are doing their best to present our perspective to Secretary Skandera and report back to those of us on the ground. There are also plans to form a larger group of teacher leaders who will hopefully translate all that state policy to those of us who are too busy planning lessons to pay attention to every change coming our way.

It would be a lie to say that I came away completely convinced of every move Secretary Skandera and her staff have made recently. I still think we can get better at helping kids and supporting teachers. But I can say that as teachers we can’t sit idly by complaining. We need to jump in there with our own ideas and solutions, from policy on down to classroom practice.

The New Mexico Teacher Summit was a valuable first step in empowering teachers to be a part of the process. I wait eagerly to find out what becomes of all the opinions and ideas that teachers shared over the summit’s two days. And I can’t wait until next year.

John Sena is an English teacher at Española Valley High School